Faber experts

Discussion in 'The Custom Shop' started by EddyR, Apr 28, 2017.

  1. EddyR

    EddyR Junior Member

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    I have three guitars that I plan to Faberize. The two Les pauls are pretty straight forward. I am planing to also do my 96 ES 135 with just the bridge and posts. Its got Buick on the back.(Bigsby) Now my question is which posts are better suited for ES guitars?Keeping in mind the laminated top and the 135 has a cromyte block in the centre.Which I dont think is real wood. Any body with any out there who has done this mod on an ES or ES type guitar?
     
  2. MSB

    MSB Senior Member

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    I don't see why the Faber stuff wouldn't work just fine on the ES center block guitars... but buy the conversion posts and the ABR from PLT and enjoy the extra money is your pocket, but that's just my .02
     
  3. ARandall

    ARandall Senior Member

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    It is pointless to do an ABR conversion just by screwing in posts into a Nashville bushing, if that is what is meant by the above post. You still have the terrible Nashville wood connection and post arrangement.
    If you are going to do the abr, go for the full solid wood connection with the press-in bushing, or the one which has to have the hole tapped for the threaded post.
     
  4. MSB

    MSB Senior Member

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    I won't disagree with you, but my experience with the Faber insert wasn't good, so not to say I don't disagree with the idea, I just doubt I'd be spending my $30 on a Faber unit again. I ended up drilling out the PLT ABR a size and just putting it on the factory nashville studs and so far have been far happier with that setup than the Faber ABRN on the nashville studs, or the Faber inserts on either their ABRN or the PLT ABR. I know its "ghetto" and is far from what I would have chosen as my setup based on what I spent on all the Faber stuff... but it worked and unlike the Faber stuff, is still on the guitar.

    Faber makes great stuff, but I see a lot of people immediately going to them and to me, there are other options out there than sometimes can yield good results for less coin
     
  5. ARandall

    ARandall Senior Member

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    What was your experience in detail. I have had a couple of each type and not had any issue either with the press in or the tapped thread version. I have had a luthier install one of them, and I have done the rest.
    Certainly the tapped wood thread one does require some skill with the wood cutting....it takes very little to make the wood oversized if you're not great with a tap. If however the installation is a little hamfisted then I can see a very loose and poor connection. Likewise if the deepening of the nashville hole for the press-in is done with insufficient care to ensure a properly aligned drilling then you will run into issue.

    As to the conversion - for mine I do any conversion to improve the bridge/wood contact, which is IMO the only reason to do the switch. The abr itself of course can technically be a poorer unit due to intonation issues. The originals did sag too, but the purity of metal I think was as much to blame there. I'd guess modern castings would be much stronger overall.
     
  6. EddyR

    EddyR Junior Member

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    Thanks for all the input guys. I think I'll go with the posts with threads for better and deeper contact with the wood. My concern was with the laminated top on the guitar I don't want damage it. And I was wondering if there was anyone who has done this conversion on an ES type of guitar. Going to order the parts this week. I'll let everyone know how it turns out.
     
  7. ARandall

    ARandall Senior Member

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    The laminate is joined by glue. In just about every test when you try and get a wood glue joint (a good one that is) to fail, its invariably the wood fibres surrounding the interface that tear apart.

    So the laminate strength will be determined by the strength of the wood fibres.....just like solid wood actually.
     
  8. Frogfur

    Frogfur Senior Member

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    This has already been posted on just recently..use the search button..
     

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