Epiphone Les Paul FAQ

Discussion in 'Epiphone Les Pauls' started by Sinmastah, Jan 25, 2009.

  1. Sinmastah

    Sinmastah Epi Verification Expert V.I.P. Member

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    Alright this thread should contain everything that has to do with Epiphone Les Pauls. Enjoy

    Q. What's is the difference between studio, standard, custom, elitist.

    A. Basically the studio standard and custom are all pretty much the same guitar, but with different trim levels. Think about cars, you can get different packages for your guitar to make it suit yourself, but you will pay more money. Your studio is your bare bones guitar, no binding, dot inlays, just kind of more boring. Standards step up up with binding on it, you start getting into plus top guitars, trap inlays, some say they have better finises, but it's a personal opinion. Customs have headstock binding, and overall just seem to be cooler. Worth paying an addition 150 for it? Maybe, dunno. All depends on what you like. Now the elitist is a whole other animal. If toyota is epiphone, lexus are the elitists. Everything is upgraded. No veneers (Except on plus tops), better Pups, electronics, neck binding, one piece maple caps (Bookmatched so technically 2 pieces). Overall a crap load better. They are comparable to Gibson Standards, some say they are better. I will let you decide for yourself.

    Q. So Elitists are better?

    Yup, Elite/Elitist Les Pauls were made in the Fujigen factory in Japan (same as MIJ Epiphone line and Orville by Gibson). Some specs are: 2 piece solid backs made of African Mahogany, 2 piece solid maple caps (veneers on + tops), one piece quartersawn neck, correct Gibson headstock angle and truss rod, bone nut, Gibson USA pickups, quality japanese switches/pots, real mother of pearl and abalone headstock inlays, small post ABR bridge, vintage correct long neck tenon joint. They are great quality instruments - the main difference between them and a Historic Reissue Gibson are the 2 piece back and the poly finish.


    Q. What is the neck profile on my Les Paul?

    A. Usually Epis are pretty similar, but it's more of a hybrid between a '59 to the '60. But leaning on the fatter side.

    Q. What is my cap made out of?

    A. Usually pieces of alder and maple stuck together with flamed/plain maple veneer on top.

    Q. What size replacement parts do I need?

    A. You need metric! I will repeat, you need metric!

    Q. I want to upgrade electronics, what parts should I get?

    A. 500k pots and .022 or .015 caps. If you want a .015 it should go in the neck to clear it up. Hit up jonesy if you want to replace your electronics. He sells imperial pots, so if you really want them, you have to sand out the pot holes. Also you will need to buy imperial knobs.

    Q. I want to mod my guitar, what order should I do this?

    1. Setup: I consider this a mod because it's beyond the original, advertised cost of the guitar. But with a lot of these guitars (especially online orders), it's a necessity if you want a guitar that has good action along with reduced fret buzz. Before considering ANY upgrades, you should get a setup from a professional on your guitar. (Roman Rist covers an extended setup in his thread up top. In most circumstances a truss rod verification, action, and intonation setup should be enough to get you going.)

    2. Straplocks: Because of the angle of the post by the neck, the strap tends to have an angle on it...and after nearly dumping my Gibson once, I was convinced that this was a necessity on my Les Paul guitars.

    3. Guitar nut: There's a lot of different materials out there. Most people like bone or tusq, but graphite and brass nuts are also considered superior to plastic. In any of these circumstances, if you're considering a nut, get one cut by a pro as a poorly slotted and fitted nut, no matter what it's made out of, will probably make the guitar sound worse, not better. Often times people will replace the nut when getting a setup done...that's not a bad idea at all as this nut will require less maintnenace than a plastic one.

    4. Capacitors: So, you've got your Epi Les Paul, you're jammin' through a good amp...but the sound isn't quite there. Hahahhaah....Note the sign that Dante did when he wrote The Inferno.

    A lot of upgrades obviously address tone and sound. The first thing I would change or verify? The capacitors. The stock ones are very, very cheap, and in truth a set of good caps might be all the difference between cleaning up your tone a bit and giving you more control over your tone knobs vs. dealing with a sound you're not quite satisfied with. It's also one of the cheapest upgrades...even with a set of good caps.

    5. Potentiometers (pots): Some people might disagree with this, but my thinking is "If it ain't broke, don't fix it". Nevertheless, changing your import pots on those guitars for some CTS pots or any other brand that makes high quality potentiometers (and upgrading the wiring along the way if you're going to dig that far in) can offer benefits to tone. Bear in mind that no matter what the tweaks, we're still talking about a signal and a ground wire sending the signal from the guitar to the amp, so it goes without saying that the transmission materials used does have an effect. A lot of times these are bumped together because they go hand in hand when someone is rewiring a guitar, but if one had to choose, I give caps the win....but it's still a great upgrade for an Epi. (And the cost to do is not expensive as long as you've got a soldering iron, some decent wire, and caps and pots which could probably be acquired for under 30 dollars for all of the components.)

    Bear in mind that if you change your pots, you're going to have to bore out the holes a bit on an Epi LP. My favorite technique is to simply roll up some sandpaper and bore out the holes by hand since the difference isn't that great...yes, it takes longer, but on the upside I don't have to worry about cracking the finish on my guitar with a drill bit.

    6. Pickups: Yup, ranked number 5. I often wonder if boutique pickups are purchased without trying other things first to improve the dynamics and tone quality of these guitars. And often, this is usually the first mod a lot of people make...and it's a great one (pickups have a lot of determination towards the sound that will come out of the amplifier) but I don't think it ranks above wiring. In any case...as far as Epi's go, I've had great luck with Gibson passive pickups in my Plus model, while my Custom got a lot of needed tone from actives. Every person probably has a slightly different idea of what they want, so atypically pickups are best left up to the consumer and their ideal of the best tone possible from an Epi.


    6. Guitar nut: There's a lot of different materials out there. Most people like bone or tusq, but graphite and brass nuts are also considered superior to plastic. In any of these circumstances, if you're considering a nut, get one cut by a pro as a poorly slotted and fitted nut, no matter what it's made out of, will probably make the guitar sound worse, not better. Often times people will replace the nut when getting a setup done...that's not a bad idea at all as this nut will require less maintnenace than a plastic one. But even at that, I do not rank this one as high as the others. It's an important component to the guitar, but as far as tone someone could also argue that as soon as your fretting a note, the nut is out of the equation outside of sympathetic vibration discourse. So, the nut's #6 on my list.

    7. Tuners: So, you have a nut, and the thing is still going out of tune? Maybe at that point you should consider tuners, although Grovers have one of the best gear ratios advertised at 18:1. IMHO if the Grovers are not working, you may want to consider going with a locking tuner since you are not dealing with string wrapping at that point. (and yes, if your wraps are not clean, your guitar will probably not stay in tune as well as it should.) I've tried a few brands, (and I will probably try a few more), but the best locking tuners I've found so far in terms of ease of use and installation on an Epi are the Planet Wave locking tuners which have a great gear ratio and clip the string so no tools are required. With a set of these you could probably change out a set of strings in literally less than 5 minutes and be off to the races. It's good stuff. (I also like Sperzels, but they have more of a bling factor to 'em.) The best cheap tuners I've tried for under 40 dollars were a set of Gotoh's that had 16:1 gear ratio. (I'm also interested in the Gibson modern machine heads for non-locking tuners...I suspect they'll have the same gear ratio as standard grovers.) A lot of people like green keys for asthetic reasons IMHO, but bear in mind that these only have an atypical 15:1 gear ratio...but with a good nut (or one that is well-maintained) that should be more than enough to keep your guitar in tune.

    Some also state that better tuners increase sustain, but that's a subjective argument IMHO and even with proven results I do not believe that the change is dramatic enough to justify the cost of tuners.

    8. Bridge: Sometimes bridges are changed out for ease of comfort, sometimes for arguments towards better tone and sustain. Although I prefer the Nashville bridges Gibson has vs. the ABR bridges on the Epiphone Tune-o-matics, a bridge should be way, way down on the priority list. The cheapest way to upgrade a bridge would probably be new saddles from Graphtech (I like the string savers), as this would likely cause the least amount of headaches since basic hardware remains the same. Others like Gotoh briges, others still Tonepros, and some have even gone for the 100 dollar Graphtech superbridges which combine their string saddles on a Tonepros II locking bridge. No matter what your poison, just make sure it's metric with the large posts so it fits in there nice and snug. You might also want to make note of your action before doing this, and be prepared to redo your intonation after changing a bridge out.

    9. Stop bar: Ranked below the bridge. there's a couples of things to consider with the stop bar: Yes, this is what allows the tone from the wood in your guitar to resonate through the strings via the miracles of sympathetic vibration. And typically, the lower your stop bar, the less resistance there is to that sympathetic vibration. But, on the downside....some argue a lower stop bar will lead to more string wear and tear. My experience: On a stock Epiphone, even if the stop bar is all the way down (which it is in most circumstances on the Epiphones), there is usually enough room to clear the ABR-1 bridge before it meets the saddle. This may not be the case on aftermarket bridges. Players will often compensate for this via top wrapping their strings over the stop bar with the added implication that there is less tension in the strings. Others favor aluminum tailpieces which offer a brighter tone vs. stainless steel or zinc for a slightly different tone.

    In my experience? Since the Epi is metric and most aftermarket vendors make tailpieces in standard sizes out of special materials, it's probably more trouble than it's worth. You should get more than enough tone through a standard stop bar.

    Q. What is under my paint job?

    A. A variety of things, I have heard there was a zakk wylde bulls eye under an ebony finish. So you can never be too sure.

    Q. What is my guitar finished with?

    A. Epiphone always uses Poly, unless it is a faded model, in which case I believe they use a satin finish. Also if your Epi is MIJ it may be finished in nitro.

    Q. My serial number is EE080502372 when was it made?

    A. It was make 2008 (first 2 digits) in May (3,4 digits) the production number was 02372 (Remaining digits)

    Q. What do the letter prefixes mean?

    A. They are the factory it was made in

    SI = Samick - Origin - Indonesia
    S = Samick - Origin - Korea
    SJ = Saejun - Origin - China
    SM = Samil - Origin - Samil,Korea
    U = Unsung - Origin - Korea
    UC = Unsung - Origin - China
    Z = Zaozhuang saehan - Origin - China
    J = T Terada - Origin - Japan
    O = Choice - Origin - Korea
    P/R = Peerless - Origin - Korea
    FN/N = Fine Guitars - Origin - Korea
    I = Saein - Origin - Korea
    K = Korea Ins - Origin - Korea
    F = Fujigen - Origin - Japan
    EE = Qingdao - Origin - China
    EA = Qingdao - Origin - China
    MC = Muse - Origin - China
    DW = Daewon Origin - China
    B = Bohemia Musico - Origin - Czech Republic

    These are the factory codes for serial numbers that start with numbers instant of letters
    11 = MIC sticker on a '08 Masterbuilt 500
    12 = DeaWon or Unsung (China -- uncertainty remains as to which factory)
    15 = Qingdao (China) -- electric
    16 = Qingdao (China) -- acoustic
    17 = China, unknown factory
    20 = DaeWon or Unsung (China -- uncertainty remains as to which factory)
    21 = Unsung, Korea
    22 = Korea, Unknown Factory
    23 = Indonesia, Unknown Factory

    Mod edit:

    Updated serial# info can be found in post #2



    Q. My guitar won't stay in tune, HELP

    A. Sometimes you will need a string change. If your strings are constantly changing pitch, it signals the end of life for your strings. Also you can lube your nut. Guitar places stock nut lube and various products. You can also just use pencil savings and place them in the slots of your nut.

    Q. I must need new tuners if my guitar won't stay in tune.

    A. Incorrect, if there is a problem with the equipment, 90% of them time it will be your nut. Lube your nut, or replace it with a Tusq or Bone nut.

    Q. Fret Buzz, help!!

    A. You need to get your guitar set up. Usually Epis are set up like crap out of the factory. You need an action and truss rod adjustment. Don't know how to do that? Take it to a tech. Sometimes you will have a high fret, and the tech can take care of that as well.

    Once I find out more info to add here I will. Thanks

    Thank you Diceman, The Sentry x2, RMC1 for additions.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2017
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  2. Sinmastah

    Sinmastah Epi Verification Expert V.I.P. Member

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    Reserved for more posting if needed.

    Edit:

    Actual serial# information from the Epi-Wiki


    YYMMFFRRRRR
    In 2008 models begin to appear without a factory i.d. letter prefix.

    • YY = Year of manufacture
    • MM = Month of manufature
    • FF = Factory I.D.
    • RRRRR = Ranking number
    Example: 08121520333 = 2008 / December / factory 15 / unit 20333

    NOTE: Pre 1994 productions also frequently omitted factory letter codes and appeared as all numbers. e.g. 3042779



    FYYMMRRRR
    • F/FF = Factory code (No factory designator for some 1993 and earlier models)
    • Y/YY = Year of manufacture (Single digit for some 1997 and earlier models)
    • MM = Month of manufacture
    • RRRR = Ranking number (may be more or less digits)
    Example: 3021234 = Samick Korea / 1993 / February / unit 1234
    Example: S3021234 = Samick Korea / 1993 / February / unit 1234
    Example: S93021234 = Samick Korea / 1993 / February / unit 1234
    Example: SI01021234 = Samick Indonesia / 2001 / February / unit 1234
    Example: SI010212345 = Samick Indonesia / 2001 / February / unit 12345



    FYYMRRRR
    • F = Factory code
    • YY = Year of manufacture
    • M = Letter code to corresponding month (A = January, B = February, etc.)
    • RRRR = Ranking number
    Example: R01B0123 = Peerless Korea / 2001 / February / unit 0123.



    FYYSSSS
    Epiphone Elite/Elitist models

    • F = Factory code (F = Fuji-gen, T = Terada)
    • Y = Single digit year of manufacture (2002-2009)
    • YY = Double digit year of manufacture (2010-Current)
    • SSSS = Sequential ranking number
    Example: F21234 = Fuji-gen Japan / 2002 / unit 1234
    Example: T101234 = Terada Japan / 2010 / unit 1234



    Factory Codes
    FACTORY LETTER CODES
    For Epiphone serial numbers that begin with a letter(s), this list identifies the factory & country where produced:



    • B - Bohêmia Musico-Delicia (Czech Republic)
    • BW - ____?____ (China)
    • CI - Cort (Indonesia)
    • DW - DaeWon (China)
    • EA - QingDao (China) = Epiphone Acoustic
    • ED - Dongbei (China) = Chinese Dongbei means North-east.
    • EE - QingDao (China) = Epiphone Electric
    • F - Fuji-gen (Japan) = Elite/Elitist models (See: Epiphone Japan Serial Numbers)
    • F - Qingdao (China) = Les Paul Standard '59 / '60 / Tribute Models (See: F-Serial used on LP Std'59/'60 models and Tribute/Plus models)
    • F/FN - Fine Guitars (Korea) = non-Japanese models
    • FC - ____?____ (China 2000's) Possibly "Global Fine Supply Ltd."
    • FC - Fuji-Gen (Japan 1990's)
    • H - _______ (China?) Found on a 1995 El Nino
    • G/GG - Identified as early modern Masterbilt acoustics (Epiphone says they have no record of G serials)
    • GR - Grand Reward (Farida, Guang Dong) China, Seen on some early Masterbilt acoustics
    • GP - ____?____ (Korea) found on a BB King Lucille from 2001 (verified by Epiphone Customer Service)
    • I - Saein (Korea)
    • J - Terada Gakki Seisakusyo (Japan)
    • J - Unknown. Possibly Jakarta, Indonesia - Found on a 1997 S-310
    • JK - ??? Korea or Indonesia - Found on a 1999 G-310 Junior
    • K - Korea Ins. (Korea)
    • L - Leader Musical Instrument Co Ltd (Korea)
    • MC - Muse (China)
    • MR - Mirr factory, China
    • N - See: FN
    • O - Choice (Korea)
    • P/R - Peerless (Korea)
    • QG - Qingdao Gibson (China) - Interim designation used prior to "EA" & "EE"
    • S - Samick (Korea)
    • SI - Samick (Bogor, Indonesia)
    • SJ - SaeJun (China)
    • SK - ???
    • SM - Samil (Korea)
    • SN - ____?____ (Indonesia)
    • T - Terada Gakki Seisakusyo (Japan)
    • U - Unsung (Korea)
    • UC - Unsung China (China)
    • WF - ____?____ (China) found on an Accu Bass Junior from 2001
    • X - ____ (China) - Early to mid 1990's serial number label - Verified by Epiphone Customer Service. Seen on "Epi" brand guitars.
    • Y - Korea (seen on a PR775CE)
    • Z - Zaozhuang Saehan (China)


    FACTORY NUMBER CODES
    For some models starting in 2008, if serial begins with numbers.

    NOTE: The factories identified by these codes are based on patterns which forum members have observed. The numbers appear as the 5th and sixth digits in the serial number.



    • 11 = MIC sticker on a '08 Masterbuilt 500
    • 12 = DeaWon or Unsung (China -- uncertainty remains as to which factory)
    • 13 = China - factory unknown
    • 15 = Qingdao (China) -- electric
    • 16 = Qingdao (China) -- acoustic
    • 17 = China - factory unknown MIC sticker on a J160E
    • 18 = China - factory unknown found on one 2009 model bass
    • 20 = DaeWon or Unsung (China -- uncertainty remains as to which factory)
    • 21 = Unsung, Korea
    • 22 = Korea (factory still unknown)
    • 23 = Samick factory Indonesia
    • I = Indonesia (this letter has appeared as the 5th digit on two authentic new models made in Indonesia)


    F-Serial used on LP Std'59/'60 models and Tribute/Plus models
    This newest serial number system used by Epiphone is not yet completely deciphered.

    'F' doesn't refer to 'Fine, Korea' - nor to 'Fuji-gen, Japan' - New "F" models are made in China.

    This serial number system doesn't exactly tell the year - and doesn't tell the month at all.



    • Beginning with F300000 in late 2009 used on LP Std'59/Std'60/Tribute models
    • Continued around F310650~F311050 in spring 2012 on Tribute-Plus models
    • Continued around F305000 in 2011
    • Continued around F310000 in 2012
    • Continued around F317000 in 2013
    • Continued around F324000 in 2014
    • Continued around F330000 in 2015



    Epiphone Japan Serial Numbers
    1998-Current
    The Yamano Gakki Epiphone Japan serial numbers from 1998 onwards are in a YMMPPP format.

    Y = Year of manufacture
    MM = Month of manufacture
    PPP = Production number


    The serial number letters used by the Terada and Fuji-Gen guitar factories are:

    • J = Terada
    • T = Terada,
    • F = Fuji-Gen
    • No Letter = Fuji-Gen
    Example: J902123 = Terada / 1999 / February / unit 123
    Example: T902123 = Terada / 1999 / February / unit 123
    Example: F902123 = Fuji-Gen / 1999 / February / unit 123
    Example: 902123 = Fuji-Gen / 1999 / February / unit 123



    1987-1997
    For Yamano Gakki Epiphone Japan semi acoustic models from 1987 to approximately 1997, the serial numbers are in a YCPPP format.
    They were made by Terada and usually have an Orange Epiphone label.


    Y = Year of manufacture
    C = Model code
    PPP = Production number


    Model Codes (C)

    • 1 = NVJ
    • 2 = EMPEROR
    • 3 = RIVIERA
    • 4 = SHERATON
    • 5 = CASINO
    • 6 = Limited Edition
    • 7 = EB-2
    • 8 = ES-930J
    • 9 = EMPEROR-J
    Example: 34123 = 1993 / SHERATON / unit 123
    Example: 38123 = 1993 / ES-930J / unit 123



    1971-1987
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Blue Label

    Blue Label "Union Made"
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Lincolnwood Label

    Brown Label
    The Aria Epiphone Japan models that were made by Matsumoku from the early 1970s and ending before 1987 do not have a reliable serial numbering system but can be approximately dated using their Epiphone label colours.



    • 1971-1975 - Blue label - Early models say "Union Made"
    • 1976-1979 - Tan or white "Lincolnwood" label with Norlin logo
    • 1980-1987 - Brown Label with splotched pattern

    Blue Labels:

    The early Japanese blue labels were left over from production at the Kalamazoo factory and were used on Japanese-made instruments until supplies ran out (approximately 1970-1971). These labels say "Union Made" in the lower left corner and are sometimes hand-stamped with "Made in Japan" at the bottom. Some of the interim blue lables had neither the "Union Made" nor "Made in Japan" markings on them. When supplies ran out, these labels were replaced with a new batch that were printed "Made in Japan" in the lower right corner. Pre-1970 "Union Made" labels are distinguishable from labels used on Japanese intruments by the printed model name of the intrument only.


    Lincolnwood Labels:

    The Lincolnwood label was also used for the Tawainese "Epi" series acoustic guitars from 1979-1980. These labels say "Made in Tawain" in the bottom right corner.




    Refurbished Models
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    MIRC Refurb Label
    Serial numbers starting with '311xxxx' on a golden sticker are 'refurbished' guitars sold by MIRC (Musical Instrument Reclamation Center)

    • There is no way to tell the year or the month it was made in the MIRC serial
    • Original serial numbers are usually defaced
    • Original warranty void
    • Sometimes the word "2nd" is stamped on back of headstock
    • MIRC specs can often be different from stock specs
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2017
  3. The_Sentry

    The_Sentry Senior Member

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    Other tips:

    1. If my guitar won't stay in tune, what can I do?

    If your guitar is new, a string change is recommended. If you've changed the strings and it still goes out of tune frequently, a cheap trick to repair this is to take graphite shavings off of a pencil or mechanical pencil lead and place them under the strings and in the slot nut. This prevents the string from binding in the nut which often leads to tuning problems.

    2. If my guitar has a lot of fret buzz, what can I do about this?

    More times often than not a guitar needs to be setup after purchase. I'd strongly recommend having a professional do it. And although Epiphone has specific setups, every guitar is a little bit different. If you want to check your action against factory specs, the action is typically set up at 4/64th of an inch between the top of the 12th fret and the bottom of the High E string, and 6/64th of an inch between the top of the 12th fret and the bottom of the Low E string on their Les Paul models. Neverthless, every guitar is a bit different.

    In any case, a setup is strongly recommended.
     
  4. Sinmastah

    Sinmastah Epi Verification Expert V.I.P. Member

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    Hmm cool. I was just going to add hardware related issues, but I can add those as well.
     
  5. diceman

    diceman V.I.P. Member

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    A little more FAQ on the Elitists: Elite/Elitist Les Pauls were made in the Fujigen factory in Japan (same as MIJ Epiphone line and Orville by Gibson). Some specs are: 2 piece solid backs made of African Mahogany, 2 piece solid maple caps (veneers on + tops), one piece quartersawn neck, correct Gibson headstock angle and truss rod, bone nut, Gibson USA pickups, quality japanese switches/pots, real mother of pearl and abalone headstock inlays, small post ABR bridge, vintage correct long neck tenon joint. They are great quality instruments - the main difference between them and a Historic Reissue Gibson are the 2 piece back and the poly finish.
     
  6. calibud

    calibud Senior Member

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    I didn't all the Q&A but I didnt see a link to the guitarprojectdater website. That would be helpful as well.
     
  7. Sinmastah

    Sinmastah Epi Verification Expert V.I.P. Member

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    Screw that site, I hate it/
     
  8. calibud

    calibud Senior Member

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    ?

    Unbiased Q&A

    Just because it doesn't work for some does not mean it does not work for most. Typically majority rules.
     
  9. Sinmastah

    Sinmastah Epi Verification Expert V.I.P. Member

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    Every fake person uses that site to garuntee authenticity. That site garuntees nothing.
     
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  10. Sinmastah

    Sinmastah Epi Verification Expert V.I.P. Member

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    If you have any additions to be made PM me and I will get it up there, and you will get honorable mention :thumb:

    Also thanks for the sticky BB
     
  11. GibsonRocker

    GibsonRocker Senior Member

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    Great Thread :thumb::thumb:
     
  12. GNR4EVR

    GNR4EVR Epi Verification Expert V.I.P. Member

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    Is that correct? Small post ABR TOM bridge? That explains a lot of my issues with mine... I have a large post ABR (actually says (g) BR) with grooved saddles and the strings have cut down into the grooves causing fret buzz. I got a new one from a guy on here, and it was small post. Is this right?
     
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  13. Sinmastah

    Sinmastah Epi Verification Expert V.I.P. Member

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    BTW imperial bridges do not work with Elitists. It didn't with mine
     
  14. GNR4EVR

    GNR4EVR Epi Verification Expert V.I.P. Member

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    Absolutely correct. The fakers have completely ruined a good thing and turned it to crap. Thats one of the biggest shames.
     
  15. GNR4EVR

    GNR4EVR Epi Verification Expert V.I.P. Member

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    So someone updated mine somewhere along the line, is that what youre saying (just want to clarify if I am using the correct small posted one.)
     
  16. KingSly

    KingSly Member

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    Yes. Guitardaterproject is kind o' worthless.

    I've got another one:

    Question:
    Is my Epi worth to spend some money on a good tech to tune it up?

    Answer:
    Yes!
    I paid about 50% of the costs of my Epi to a Luthier who did a fantastic job.
    If I didn't know for sure, I would say he swapped my Epi to another one. Now it feels and plays great!
     
    ToyzShopGary likes this.
  17. diceman

    diceman V.I.P. Member

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    They are small post - I've heard that you can use a Gibson ABR bridge with your existing thumbwheels (small post, metric thread) but have not done so myself...

    You can get a replacement bridge from a Gibson "repair center" (not a regular over the counter part)
     
  18. GNR4EVR

    GNR4EVR Epi Verification Expert V.I.P. Member

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    Thanks, Dice. It appears someone replaced the posts on mine as well, so when I got the right one in the mail, its holes were too small to mount which made me say :wtf:
    I couldnt very well put the small posts in since the holes are oversized now, so I ended up drilling the new bridge to fit, which works fine. Later on I will get the Gibson bridge I guess, but it works fine for now.
     
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  19. Sinmastah

    Sinmastah Epi Verification Expert V.I.P. Member

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    Can you drill through the metal so it will make my bridge fit?

    Hmmm
     
  20. GNR4EVR

    GNR4EVR Epi Verification Expert V.I.P. Member

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    Worked fine for me. Looks a little funny with the larger thumbwheels, but hey, its temporary anyway.
     

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