cracked neck

Discussion in 'Epiphone Les Pauls' started by joe19680, Jan 6, 2012.

  1. Plank Spanker

    Plank Spanker Member

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    Good question and smart thinking. I know no easy, guaranteed way to deal with this. My approach is to try to limit glue squeeze-out, particularly around the rod. You need enough glue to completely cover the surfaces to be bonded, but as little excess (squeezout) as possible. I would think that a small (very small) amount of glue near or even on the rod would not hinder function, while glue substantially filling the cavity or really bonding the rod to the neck would be a problem. Insufficient or excess glue was not a problem for me in the two headstocks I repaired, so I would be confident, but maybe I was just stupid lucky. Hope it goes well for you.
     
  2. Phildog

    Phildog Senior Member

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    I agree with Plank Spanker. When I repaired mine, There was glue around the truss. It wasn't a large amount, but then again, it wasn't s couple of drops either. But today my truss rod is fully functional, so I think you'll be just fine.
     
  3. intrique45

    intrique45 Senior Member

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    Hey I am In Bergen County If you need any help just holler
     
  4. joe19680

    joe19680 Senior Member

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    thanks guys... the other post in the luthier corner someone made sense to me... the truss rod on epis have a plastic sleeve round them and it pulls not turns so should be fine but will take care not to make too much of a mess... have to finish unpacking and get to this hopefully by tues when i can devote some time to it... thanks for the offer intrique45... if i run into a snag i will holler your way... looks like i will be ok with this tho... actually looking forward to doing this and getting it back up and playing...
     
  5. Phildog

    Phildog Senior Member

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    Thanks for posting that info Joe. It's got to be true, because like I said, I got a good amount of glue around mine. But after it dried, (I waited a couple of days) I had no issues or "stickiness" when adjusting it. I'm pretty sure you're gonna be just fine.
     
  6. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Senior Member

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    Perhaps you could apply a thin coat of mineral oil to the rod to prevent adhesion? Assuming, of course, you can apply it without getting the oil onto the wood?
     
  7. thexmadxtopxhatter

    thexmadxtopxhatter Senior Member

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    snap that sucker
     
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  8. joe19680

    joe19680 Senior Member

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    good point... since it has now been brought up... is it better to completely break it off to cover the surfaces fully? the crack closes so nicely with just finger pressure tho... just keeping an open mind to any advise before i get started... thanks
     
  9. Mr Teeny

    Mr Teeny Senior Member

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    If the crack closes nicely with finger pressure don't go snapping it off fully you could end up a lot worse off with splintered ends etc and there's no need if you can get glue down there. Even the clamping is likely to squeeze some glue down there and it looks like it'll open up a far way so getting glue in shouldn't be a problem and even if you miss a little at the end it'll only be 1% or so of the full contact area.

    Remember the pro's have allsorts of fancy jigs to line up two separate pieces of wood,, you don't, so any bit still attached works in your favour to keep the crack aligned properly when gluing. Just follow Phildog's advice and you'll be fine.

    Unless you're doing the sort of neck repairs BCRGreg does it's not really rocket science gluing two bits of wood back together and most of the repair costs probably come in for the refinishing rather than the gluing.
     
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  10. joe19680

    joe19680 Senior Member

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    one comment that makes a lot of sense, im sticking to Phildogs advice on doing it and Thumpalumpacus advise on having a beer as well... thanks
     
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  11. Hack

    Hack Senior Member

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    How freakin cool is that?

    That's why I like this place!

    MLPers Rock.
     
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  12. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Senior Member

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    Good! Being relaxed is important when you're doing stuff like this.

    Fvckin' A.
     
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  13. joe19680

    joe19680 Senior Member

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    got some time to get this glued and get some pics up... the crack is glued back and is solid , used the floss pic to get glue down into the crack... but new problem.. the nut groove is messed up on the side where it cracked... its making the nut not sit properly... the bass string side is good... thought maybe some filler in there? not sure.. looking for any suggestions.
     

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  14. muddlers

    muddlers Junior Member

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    I've cracked my neck also and had to do this too. you may have to square it back up using a small file and sandpaper because of the excess glue. Once you get it squared up you may want to go ahead and install a new nut with the money you just saved. I installed a tusq nut and it seems to be very good quality and easy to work with. the tusq nut gives you a little extra material to work with so you can fit it right. good luck and congrats on your first fix.
     
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  15. joe19680

    joe19680 Senior Member

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    thanks, i am glad its turning out as good as it is... thanks to all the help here!.. its hard to see in those pics my dilemma... these may explain better... this is the nut placed in, the one side fits nice and even and snug in the groove while the other side where the break happened there is a gap where wood has splintered away a bit... just some finger pressure and it rocks over... just looking for some suggestions on some type of filler i could use that i can sand or file out smooth for the new nut... thanks
     

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  16. Kyle76

    Kyle76 Senior Member

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    I've never used it for a guitar, but I've had good succes with Durham's Rock Hard Water Putty. It's a powder that you mix, so you can get it a little thin if you need to so it will flow into any gaps. You can work it with any type of wood file or sandpaper. I'd suggest using the edge of a large bastard file where it is completely flat and fits right down into the groove. Let the putty dry completely and go slow with the filing, but you should be able to level and square up that groove with no problems.
     
  17. Phildog

    Phildog Senior Member

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    That's not bad. In fact, it's rather typical. Take two old strings...a low E and a high E. String them up to tune. Keep a mental note on the gap that's been affected by the break under string tension. If, the two strings can be tuned and intonated, that's a great sign. I'd loosen the strings and dab some Titebond in the nut slot. But I'd use a wee bit more, maybe two drops, on the "bad side". Then tune the strings and leave it to dry overnight.

    DEFINITELY DON'T TRY TO LEVEL OUT THE NUT SLOT YOURSELF. JUST USE A COUPLE OF EXTRA DROPS OF TITEBOND TO COMPENSATE FOR THE CHIP OF MISSING WOOD.


    Of course, if there is a better method with more reliable results, I'd really like to know for future reference.

    Thanks for this post Joe. I learned something from it.

    Continuedd good luck my friend. You should be playing her in a couple of days.
     
  18. joe19680

    joe19680 Senior Member

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    hey Phildog... i hate to say it but its beyond that... the tusq nut i put in only used crazy glue.. was fine and could be removed if need be... but looking further into this the nut sits in on a steep angle already if you notice the pic the bottom of the nut is flat and the side with the crack is way below the fretboard... the glue would have to sit in there and harden and hope its level... the crack went right thru the nut slot on the treble side... has to be a filler i can sand level that would support the nut on that side... i hope that explained it...lol
     
  19. Phildog

    Phildog Senior Member

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    You've explained it well enough for me to picture it. I still don't think it's all that bad. Try this... get some wood filler. Put some in the damaged area of the nut slot. Don't try to level it. Use the nut for that. Put a little bit of cooking grease on the bottom of the nut which will be over the damaged area. Then, place the nut in it's position and give a little bit of pressure. Get it to where the nut is level. When you're satisfied that it's level, remove the nut. The grease on the bottom of it should have kept it from sticking to the wood filler. Then let the wood filler fully dry. Then sand it to you liking. You should have a nice nut slot without using files and risk altering it. Once it's dry and the edges sanded, it should be ready for you to re-install the nut. Make sense?
     
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  20. joe19680

    joe19680 Senior Member

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    that sounds like a good idea... i dont want to alter anything but it wont let me place the old or new nut in there without it being uneven across the neck... that idea sounds like it would work well... i ordered a new nut anyway just to be sure... any ideas on the filler to be used?
     

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