Confused about multi tracking

Discussion in 'Recording Studio' started by drew365, Dec 9, 2016.

  1. drew365

    drew365 Senior Member

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    I'm a dinosaur. The last time I recorded multi tracks was on a 1/2 tape Tascam 80-8.
    I've been recording guitar parts on my computer for several years. I use a Presonus Audio Box 22VSL into a laptop with Mixcraft 7 loaded.
    Now, I'm wondering what I need to record a drum set with more mic inputs. If I get, say an eight mic input Presonus, can all those inputs be sent to my DAW through USB to separate tracks so I can mix them at a later time?
    If I can, is there any limit to the number of tracks I can record simultaneously via USB, other than the size of the interface I use?
    It seems like a dumb question, but I only have experience with a recorder that takes individual inputs to each track and I'm not positive what I can do with USB. Thanks for any help.
     
  2. Pwrmac7600

    Pwrmac7600 Premium Member

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    If you are asking if you can record using all 8 inputs of your interface simultaneously. I would say as long as you have a farly newer model computer with sufficient ram you should be ok. Then yes you can assign each input to its own track and mix them later.
     
  3. DarrellV

    DarrellV 1 Year old and 8K this month or bust! Premium Member

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    ^^^^^^
    Yes, actually, that is the idea of multi input interfaces. Each port can go to a separate track and remain synced together as a whole.
    Normally you assign input to track within your DAW.

    I have used the Presonus Firewire stuff before the USB came out, but it's got to work the same.

    When you have finished recording those 8 inputs just rewind your DAW back to the beginning and add more tracks below your first 8 and re assign your inputs to those.

    Oh, be sure to dis-arm the first 8 to protect them from over writing while you are recording your next set of tracks.

    You should be able to cue (listen) to your original tracks while you record the next set, and so on.

    Much easier than a tape recorder.

    Most DAWS allow punch in and out per track to fix stuff too, just like the tape days.

    Have fun! :)
     
  4. drew365

    drew365 Senior Member

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    I just wanted to make sure I wasn't assuming something that was wrong. My laptop has 16g ram, Intel Core i7 @ 2.6Ghz, Win10 Home.
    I'm just hoping to lay down some basic tracks to some songs with drums, bass, keyboards and guitar at one time. Probably five mics on the drums, one on the bass, guitar straight in through my Helix, and keyboard straight in. I have to figure out a head phone amp also.
    Thanks, now I can plan some gear acquisition. It's been about 26 years since I recorded a full band. Things have changed a bit since then. I wish I had my old mics still.
     
  5. Pwrmac7600

    Pwrmac7600 Premium Member

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    Oh yeah your system is good to go. Same setup I have on my mac mini actually. you'll be able to do plenty!
    Have fun man!
     
  6. LDS714

    LDS714 Member

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    Until I could afford good mics, I used the Samson 7Kit on almost everything. Kick mic on the bass, SDCs on acoustics and tom/snare mics on guitar amps.
     
  7. dmoss74

    dmoss74 Senior Member

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    you could always do the glyn johns method, but that isn't stereo. but in the beginning of things, keeping tracks/channels down to a minimum--on drums--might make for a much easier recording situation.

    and don't overlook the use of loops (many available online) to get at least ideas down.

    or there are the various drum sampling vsti/s out there. i use addictive drums 2. it's quite useful to me. no, it's not perfect, and no a real drummer, but it works.
     
  8. KP11520

    KP11520 Senior Member

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    I took a class and they used two overhead LDCs, an SM57 on the snare and either an Audix or Sure Beta 52a on the kick. They went through an apogee quartet. Some appropriate plug-ins and very nice.

    Pre's are just as important as the Mic's chosen. More isn't always merrier, especially when the budget is low.

    Hope this helps!
     
  9. yeti

    yeti Senior Member

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    Since when is the Glyn Johns method not stereo?
     
  10. Freddy G

    Freddy G V.I.P. Member

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    I was going to ask this as well. Maybe what he meant was that it takes four mics not two....:dunno:
     
  11. dmoss74

    dmoss74 Senior Member

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    my bad. i meant to say that the drums aren't able to be individually panned, as with multi-mic setups.
     
  12. Freddy G

    Freddy G V.I.P. Member

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    Actually, I find that the two "overheads" in the Glynn Johns set-up do a beautiful job of stereo imaging.

    As far as multi mic set-ups, I try to match the individual tom mic panning position to how they appear in the stereo overheads.
     
  13. dmoss74

    dmoss74 Senior Member

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    i've only seen the gj setup using one overhead, but i'm sure there are plenty of alternatives. i have never tried it myself. i've only heard the "standard" results, from work he has done.

    i (personally) have no experience with the following scenario, but i have heard great drum tracks recorded with a single mic, or two mics (one in front, from above, and a bd mic). as small studio recordings, mind you.

    a great drummer, like any great musician, should be easy to record. and when i say great, i mean one who has total command of their dynamics, and who is able to keep the output relative to the music they are playing to. i have great respect for guys/gals who can do that.
     

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