Bridgeport Questions...

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Beckspeed, Mar 19, 2008.

  1. Beckspeed

    Beckspeed Member

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    Ok I've tried tossing this idea out in another thread but I'll try here again, maybe it'll spark some interest.

    I have access to 2 bridgeport mills, but I exclusively use them for metal. I'm going to build myself a new LP and and use this for a lot of the procedures.
    1) Leveling and planing the body to my desired thickness. 2) Cutting 3.5 degree body angle. 3) Removing material for the chamber 4) Drilling all mounting holes.

    My question is: What type of bits and RPM should I use for wood? Can I use a "flycutter" to level the wood like aluminum or steel. I know many wood cutting tools work well on aluminum (believe it or not) but not on steel. so my that can I assume I can go at a similar (high) RPM and tooling? Any info would be great.

    thanks
     
  2. Roman

    Roman Master Luthier V.I.P. V.I.P. Member

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    You are in San diego, not far at all. come up to LA. We'll help you out.
     
  3. CyborgCNC

    CyborgCNC Member

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    Hello,

    I have cut a few bodies and neck with my home-build cnc machine. The bits are use are primarily as follows:

    For Inlay: I use small diameter flat bottom mills, usually with a 1/8 inch shank. I have found a good place for them here:

    Precision solid carbide tools for woodworking and metal forming.

    and here:

    http://www.americancarbide.com.

    If you are going to cut shell or perl or abalone, that stuff is TOUGH! So use a mill meant for this job, like the one precisebits sells. it works quite well (also for cutting fret slots).

    For guitar and neck machining, typical flat and bull nose carbide bits (I prefer the Up-cut spirals) will do. I have had no issues cutting ebony, maple, sapele, mahogany etc with bits like these.

    Fur surfacing, what has worked well for me is a flat router bit (with a 1/4 shank) of like 1 inch in diameter. I create a surface tool path at a particular depth, and I get very clean cuts.

    I usually am at about 10K rpm for the router, with 28-35 IPM for feed rate (my machine is not much faster than this).

    So it is a bit slow, but the results are great.

    Hope this helps you out a bit.
     
  4. Beckspeed

    Beckspeed Member

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    thanks Cyborg - yeah that's definitely helpful, I just need to see what the RPM range is on our Bridgeport, we always use it at the slowest RPM and I'll do a manual feed. Have you tried any surfacing bits larger than 1"? That's why I was thinking a flycutter.

    Roman - I will take you up on a visit to the shop in LA, I have some stuff I need to bang out on my car the next couple of weekends but let me see what I can do. what are your weekend hours? Maybe we can exchange some shop tours if you're ever in North San Diego county.

    thanks again guys
     
  5. Roman

    Roman Master Luthier V.I.P. V.I.P. Member

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    I got an idea ( you gave it to me):naughty:

    Maybe come on out, I'll work on your guitar, you bang on my car??
     
  6. Beckspeed

    Beckspeed Member

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    that depends...you got something cool for me to beat on? I have a shit pile Honda I gladly neglect on a daily basis...I won't bring you any hondo guitars to work on either. haha.
     
  7. Roman

    Roman Master Luthier V.I.P. V.I.P. Member

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    I wouldn't insult you:)
     
  8. Beckspeed

    Beckspeed Member

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    deal. I'll be in touch. thanks again.
     

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