Any Aging/Relicing Experts Here?

Discussion in 'The Custom Shop' started by pinefd, Jan 29, 2018.

  1. pinefd

    pinefd V.I.P. Member Premium Member V.I.P. Member

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    As you probably know, I’ve done quite a bit of guitar building and painting, but I’ve never aged a guitar. And although I like a nice relic job, it’s something I don’t expect to do much of myself.

    That said, I recently purchased an aged guitar that doesn’t look quite right to me. The checking looks great, but the dings/dents in the maple top look way too light colored, and too much like new wood. Do you have any recommmendations on what to use to stain or age those light wood dents to make it look more like it dirtied up over time. And please don’t suggest that I gig it and do it naturally. I don’t gig, and in fact, don’t really play much, so that approach just won’t work with me.

    Thanks in advance for any suggestions you might have.


    Frank
     
  2. NotScott

    NotScott Silver Supporter

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  3. pinefd

    pinefd V.I.P. Member Premium Member V.I.P. Member

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    Looks interesting! Thanks...I’ll check it out!


    Frank
     
  4. NotScott

    NotScott Silver Supporter

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    Just wipe on and wipe off. It is not real drastic so you can easily control how much coloration you need by adding coats. I have also used it to color in some dings on a relic Strat and darken some rosewood boards too. Best thing about it is you can find it at your local supermarket, Target or Walmart.
     
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  5. rockstar232007

    rockstar232007 Senior Member

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    I've heard brown shoe-polish works really well.;)
     
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  6. d1m1

    d1m1 Senior Member

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    a friend of mine placed his historic in the winter next to the radiator for an hour or so and then placed it outsinde in the balcony for an hour. he did that couple times and the guitar got authentic weather checkings. before doing that he removed plastics and electronics and he loosened a little the trus rod. he plays the guitar since and it looks now like an old one. thats actually how vintage guitars aged. folks giged in hot bars etc. and then went out in the cold. till they arrived home the guitar had a couple checkings more. the laquer is of course important to. real nitro checks faster than custom shop laquer which is mixed with plastic.
     
  7. moreles

    moreles Senior Member

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    Wanting a believable relic while stating that you don't gig or even play much seems strange. Good luck with the improvement in appearance. I don't relic anything, but I have used that Old English scratch blender and as the other posts say, it is easy to apply and to work in stages so you don't get an instant, bad result that you can't change. My approach to relicing is to buy used, old, and vintage guitars. I hardly ever see a relic that, up close, looks believable.
     
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  8. pinefd

    pinefd V.I.P. Member Premium Member V.I.P. Member

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    Thanks for your input and for your comments about Old English. I did pick some of that up, in both the light wood and dark wood versions, and will probably give that a try. In fact, I plan to do some practicing around the house on some of our old furniture that’s starting to show its age.

    As for my wanting a believable relic, keep in mind that this is a factory aged guitar that I bought. And while the checking looks great, the dings in the finish look like they were just applied yesterday...thus the reason for wanting a way to subtly make those less obvious. To tell the truth, I would have preferred if this particular guitar was not aged, but alas, I fell in love with the guitar, and am just trying to make it a little more “perfect”.

    Also, please keep in mind that I ain’t no newbie when it comes to how an old guitar should look. I currently own two ‘59 ‘bursts and a half dozen other vintage Les Pauls. And I can’t count the number that I’ve sold over the years.

    But thanks again for taking the time to share your thoughts.


    Frank
     
  9. pinefd

    pinefd V.I.P. Member Premium Member V.I.P. Member

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    And thanks to @NotScott for the original Old English suggestion and the rest of you for your input! Much appreciated!


    Frank
     
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  10. Kris Ford

    Kris Ford Senior Member

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    The Old English works well on getting rid of the bright "new" looking white on plastic too! (I've used it on pickguard edges and TRCs)

    Does a GREAT job on a nitro Strat neck too!
     
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  11. WezV

    WezV Senior Member

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    I use a liquid scratch cover (colron in the uk) for patina, not sure if its the same as the above, certainly a much smaller bottle.

    Works great on plastic too, much better than the coffee/tea/show polish methods i see quoted everywhere... or me at least i use it after a bit of physical wear

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2018
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  12. Kingdom of Nye

    Kingdom of Nye Senior Member

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    When I was working in a guitar factory that started making relics, we used a little dark walnut minwax and rubbed it over the fresh exposed wood to give it more of an aged look.
     
  13. deadlyweasel

    deadlyweasel Silver Supporter

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    I have used some black and brown shoe polish, black and brown leather dye, and oddly enough I used coffee very successfully.
     
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  14. pinefd

    pinefd V.I.P. Member Premium Member V.I.P. Member

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    Rockstar also mentioned shoe polish, but I have some serious reservations about using that. On more than one occasion, especially when using brown shoe polish, I've seen a great deal of red bleeding from the brown polish. I've seen this in a couple of applications, including guitar relicing applications, and don't want to take that risk. Brown leather dye is a possibility, and I already have some of that. Still experimenting, though, and haven't decided which way to go on this.

    Thanks for all the suggestions, guys!


    Frank
     
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  15. Jymbopalyse

    Jymbopalyse Senior Member

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    Here are the best two relicing/aging tools you will ever encounter.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Or you could just play it.
     
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  16. pinefd

    pinefd V.I.P. Member Premium Member V.I.P. Member

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    Old news.

    Here's where I'm at so far...what do you think?

    [​IMG]

    Frank
     
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  17. Jymbopalyse

    Jymbopalyse Senior Member

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    Hands down . . . . you win :cheers2:
     
  18. Bluzebear

    Bluzebear Junior Member

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  19. Bluzebear

    Bluzebear Junior Member

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    Very easy Frank. I have painted and reliced a few guitars, and all I did to darken the wood was to get some gunky grease from a car engine and then wipe onto the guitar as wanted. Start by rubbing with a cloth lightly , or bear down hard if you want the effect to be darker. Good luck !
     
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  20. judson

    judson Senior Member

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    yeah that will clean up real nice...just hit it with a car buffer for 3 or 4 mins...:h5:
     

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