Advice Needed!! Best way to store a Strat Neck off the guitar long term?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by yamariv, Dec 13, 2017.

  1. yamariv

    yamariv Senior Member

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    Hey Guys,

    I've decided to replace the Original Maple neck on my beloved 96 American Stratocaster for a Rosewood version as I find Maple just doesn't slide as well under my fingers as Rosewood. (Plus, I personally like the look of Rosewood better too :naughty:)

    So because I love this guitar and the Maple neck is gorgeous I want to safely store it in the closet in the best possible conditions. What would be the best way to store it Truss Rod wise?? Do I loosen the truss rod completely or leave it with a hair of tension to hold a bit of relief in the neck? Obviously storing with a back bow would be a no no..

    Thanks for the help!
     
  2. Freddy G

    Freddy G V.I.P. Member

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    I'd store it with no tension. But much more important than that, store it in stable temp and humidity.
     
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  3. ARandall

    ARandall Senior Member

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    ^ hey Freddy.....would no tension also equal a straight neck most of the time if the neck is a bit old??

    I'm just wondering if some well used necks end up being a little off straight with no tension whether you would add some TR action if that removed any bend.
     
  4. Freddy G

    Freddy G V.I.P. Member

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    I think it's best if the neck at rest in proper temp and humidity has a bit of natural forward relief with no truss rod tension. The rod is only there to counteract the string pull, and you don't want it to settle into a tension-ed state when there's no strings to counterbalance it.
     
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  5. yamariv

    yamariv Senior Member

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    Thanks Freddy!! Makes sense, thanks for the help! I'll keep it safe and sound in an upstairs closet.
     
  6. StillLearning

    StillLearning Senior Member

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    Just out of curiosity, what is the proper temp and humidity? I know for wines there are optimal settings that shouldn't change should you want to age a good bottle properly. Does the same hold true for something like this, and if so, what is it?
     
  7. StillLearning

    StillLearning Senior Member

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    To be specific...to age a good red wine you want the temp in the 55 degree range and around 65-75% humidity. Are there guidelines similar for guitar woods?
     
  8. TheZ

    TheZ Senior Member

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    Better yet, grab a spare Strat body and keep it strung up, just in case :naughty:
     
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  9. pshupe

    pshupe Senior Member

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    I keep my shop at 40 - 45% RH all year long. Temp isn't that much of a concern but I have a heater in the winter and air con in the summer, mostly for my comfort. This seems to be a standard, for my area any way. I'm sure if you lived in the desert you may keep the humidity much less to be closer to what the wood would be exposed to after the product is finished. It's the large swings in humidity that cause the problems, especially for thin and / or unfinished wood. Currently my house is about 25% humidity and my guitars are fine. I will start humidifying my house soon, again mainly for comfort.

    Cheers Peter.
     
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  10. yamariv

    yamariv Senior Member

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    Haha, oh no! :hmm: Now you've put that idea in my head....I like that idea! :naughty:
     
  11. Freddy G

    Freddy G V.I.P. Member

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    A rule of thumb is wood is happy where you are happy. That means room temperature but far more importantly a medium humidity. You would not enjoy living is a hot, humid attic or a cold dank basement....neither does the wood. Temp is easy to control in a dwelling....everybody does it. Humidity is less easy. I keep my shop at 45% relative humidity. But in the dead of winter all the windows are dripping with condensation. But my strict humidity is because I build and it's critical for wood to have moisture equilibrium before working and gluing together. For a guitar that's already build the humidity swing can be much larger. Between 30-55% humidity is fine (with 45% being ideal)
     
  12. moreles

    moreles Senior Member

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    My 2 cents is that the temp and humidity are indeed worth managing, but tension is not. I would loosen the rod and lubricate threads so they don’t seize up. String tension is not a plus and exerts no helpful effect over time. I think your neck is better off stored unstressed.
     
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