ABR-1 flushed down when changing strings

Discussion in 'Historics & Reissues' started by MarcBolas, Aug 17, 2017.

  1. MarcBolas

    MarcBolas Junior Member

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    Hello fellas,

    I recently bought my first CS LP: a lovely 2014 R8 VOS in lemonburst. A couple of days ago I decided to put a fresh set of strings on it, and well, refer to the title of the thread. When I was done winding the strings I realized that the bridge was flushed all the way down into the body of the guitar (more so on the lower strings)! See attached picture for reference.

    I panicked a little bit, then released some string tension and adjusted the bridge up a bit. It seems like intonation didn't suffer, and the action is almost as good as it was before (the action was one of my favorite things about how the guitar felt when I bought it).

    Anyway, I wanted to ask if this is normal or if I should be concerned.

    Thank you!
     

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  2. LeftyF2003

    LeftyF2003 Premium Member

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    That is quite low, but the good news for you is you can deck the tailpiece and get some more sustain. If you can get a descent action then it's all good. If it were to the point that you couldn't set up the guitar then I'd be concerned that you'd need a neck reset.
     
  3. MarcBolas

    MarcBolas Junior Member

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    Thank you for the response! Not sure I understand the neck reset part. The bridge just dropped down after I took the strings off, it wasn't like that before. I was able to use the wheels to bring it back up after I had put the strings on (I had to lower the tension a bit), and now it seems to be fine. My concern was the fact that the bridge sort of fell down on its own when I took the strings off.

     
  4. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Tape your thumbwheels to the bridge with some blue painter's tape when you are changing strings to keep them from spinning around and adjusting themselves.

    You can use a rubber band, also. Like a figure 8 over the bridge. Then you cut the old strings off and they slip out from under it. That will hold it in place until you put the new ones on.

    Along those lines, if your tailpiece falls off when you change strings, lower one side and raise the other to lock it in. Locking tailpieces my ass! A quarter or half turn in opposite directions of the tail studs will lock a tailpiece in place.
     
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  5. PierM

    PierM Premium Member

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    Did you buy used or new? Sounds like your thumb-wheels, and/or the posts, are not matching...so that the bridge is "falling" down with thumbwheels because the thread holes are probably too wide for the posts. If I'm right, you need the string tension to pull the thumb-wheels against the posts, and this is preventing the "gravity" to work. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2017
  6. Rocco Crocco

    Rocco Crocco Senior Member

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    Great tip for the tailpiece... thanks!
     
  7. LeftyF2003

    LeftyF2003 Premium Member

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    That is odd if the bridge can fall like that. As Cooljuk said you may have the wrong thumb wheels for the posts, or the posts may be stripped.
     
  8. MarcBolas

    MarcBolas Junior Member

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    Thank you all for your replies. I hope it's something more along the lines of what Cooljuk said: that the thumb wheels just moved around when I was changing strings.

    I just ordered some new pickups and I'll take the opportunity to ask my tech for a setup and to give me his opinion on the issue.

    Thanks again.
     
  9. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    I didn't say that. lol!
     
  10. DarrellV

    DarrellV Almost 1 Year old this month! Premium Member

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    OP is happy...who's counting the score, LOL!:laugh2:
    Bonus points for the win! :dude:
     
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  11. LeftyF2003

    LeftyF2003 Premium Member

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    Ha ha sorry, didn't mean to put words in your mouth. If OP is happy then all is well :thumb:
    (It was PierM who was suggesting an issue with the thumb wheels)

    PS - personally I try not to take all the strings off at once on my guitars with a bridge / tailpiece. If you change one string at a time you won't have an issue.
     
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  12. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    I'm just giving you a hard time, man. :D All good. :cheers2:

    Generally, those wheels will stay pretty well put but even a half turn or a turn will throw the action off from what it was so I like tape and/or rubber bands to be safe, myself.
     
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  13. Wizard of Ozz

    Wizard of Ozz Member

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    +1 on the tape. I've been doing that for years. Tape down the bridge and studs too.
     
  14. TKOjams

    TKOjams Senior Member

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    change you strings one at a time ;)
     
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  15. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Well, ok. There's that, also. ...for the graceful among us.

    At the shop, when I'm changing strings, it's generally because there's more work to be done on the guitar that the strings are in the way of. Sometimes I forget people change strings simply for replacing them. lol! I'm a "grab 'em all at once and nip with dykes" kinda guy. :thumb:


    Why does that sound dirty?
     
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  16. MarcBolas

    MarcBolas Junior Member

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    Thank you all for your kind replies. Indeed, I took off all the strings at once because I wanted to polish the frets and clean the fretboard.
     
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  17. Dilver

    Dilver Senior Member

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    I'm confused by this thread. Did the bridge "drop" or did it just get lowered in the process of changing your strings? If it's the former, then as someone mentioned earlier, the bridge probably doesn't fit the posts (it should only lower by turning the the thumbwheels). If it just got lowered in the process of changing the strings, just turn the thumbwheels to raise the bridge to where you want it. No big deal.
     
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  18. I Break Things

    I Break Things Senior Member

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    I don't even do that with a floating trem. Snip the things off and wrestle with the daggum thing to get it strung up. That's the only way to do it. Other option is set it on fire and order a new guitar.
     
  19. mudface

    mudface Senior Member

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    One string at a time for me unless swapping pick-ups or fret board cleaning like you said. Sometimes when cutting the strings all off, the relief of tension plays havoc on the neck and becomes a bitch to get it stable again. This happens with newer instruments than older ones that seem to build up wood tension "memory". So replacing one at a time keeps tension on the neck insuring stable tuning. This has been my experience.
     
  20. asapmaz

    asapmaz Senior Member

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    Almost always one-at-a-time for me, too. I don't like releasing the tension on the neck at all.
    I cringe at having to stabilize the neck after a bigger job. It takes a while for the guitar to settle in.
     

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