A Bittersweet NGD

Discussion in 'Fender' started by NotScott, Aug 26, 2017.

  1. NotScott

    NotScott Silver Supporter Premium Member

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    I am quite happy with my guitar collection and was not looking to add another guitar but, this one has a new home as of today:

    [​IMG]

    It's a 2010 American Standard Telecaster. It is in remarkable condition and has some crazy grain:

    [​IMG]

    I am not a fan of modern "improvements" made to classic designs. I prefer my guitars as close to the original 1950s designs as possible, that includes neck radius, hardware, finish, etc.. However, after playing this for a couple hours today, it sounds and plays great! This may be that rare guitar that I won't mess with and leave as I received it. The other reason I do not intend to mod this guitar is the bittersweet part. My ex-brother-in-law and long time band mate just passed away last week and left behind some guitars. My niece and nephew thought that I should have this one and just delivered it to me this morning. What is even more bittersweet about this is that my niece and nephew did not know that Jimi had always encouraged me to play Teles and that he was the primary reason why I bought my first Tele several years ago.

    I met Jimi at a party I was playing at when I was 16. Jimi needed a better guitar player and I needed a better band so after our meeting, Jimi and I started playing everywhere together. Jimi always had ideas for gigs, band projects and was always looking to do more. He introduced me to many fine players and always inspired me to be better, both as a musician and a person. Jimi soon met and married my sister but, as often happens in life, Jimi and I drifted apart as bandmates, friends and family but, he was never far from my thoughts.

    Several years later, at my nephew's wedding, Jimi made sure that I knew he wanted to talk to me about something important. Jimi and I had not spoken in several years and he was now my ex-brother-in-law. At the wedding, Jimi wanted to put another band together, a sort of "bucket list" band for him consisting of his favorite band mates from over the years. I was honored that he thought so highly of me but, I really wasn't interested in playing professionally any longer. However, Jimi always had a talent for inspiring and pushing people where they needed to be so, a few weeks later, we put a band together with Jimi's other favorite players. We put a lot of work into that band dealing with people's schedules, current musical tastes and trying to beat the clock on Jimi's declining health but sadly, Jimi's health deteriorated to the point that he had to leave the band he founded before he was able to join us on stage. The band carried on without Jimi. He was able to come to one of our first gigs. His health would not allow him to stay long and I didn't get a chance to speak much with him but, he did give me a thumbs-up as he walked past the stage on his way out. If you knew Jimi, you would know that simple gesture was like an imprimatur from the Pope.

    At his memorial service yesterday, I was surprised at how many people showed up. I knew Jimi had many, many friends but the turnout was beautiful. During the eulogy, the pastor had many nice things to say about Jimi, as Jimi was his bass player for the churches P&W group. Aside from playing bass at his church, Jimi served as a youth minister and was known to buy and give away guitars and amps to struggling musicians. That was the kind of man Jimi was.

    Jimi was never a conformist and in an era where reality has become secondary to feelings, Jimi was at his nonconformist best. You always knew what Jimi was thinking and where you stood with him. He always gave you the truth, in stark black and white, whether you wanted it or not. I don't believe he ever realized how many lives he positively influenced just by being Jimi. He was that positive influence in my life and for that, I will most miss my friend and always remember this NGD.

    Sorry for the long-winded and side-tracked post. Thanks for reading.
     
  2. guidothepimmp

    guidothepimmp Senior Member

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    condolences and sorry for your loss
     
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  3. Bobby Mahogany

    Bobby Mahogany Senior Member

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    Beautiful story.
    Nice guitar to have and the memories that come with it.
    Sorry for your loss.
     
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  4. Bud Stoner

    Bud Stoner Senior Member

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    Sorry for your loss.

    That was a great story, and thank you for sharing.
     
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  5. Falconbill

    Falconbill Premium Member

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    Congrats on your tele. Condolences on your loss.
     
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  6. Walt_T

    Walt_T Senior Member

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    My '72 Tele came to me in a very similar way. Treasure it.​
     
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  7. NotScott

    NotScott Silver Supporter Premium Member

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    My condolences and I understand completely.

    I enjoy playing it but, I still haven't lost that strange feeling I get whenever I pick it up. Hopefully after more time with it and as it becomes more of MY guitar, that feeling will go away.
     

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