_MIJ__FAQ_+_Links

Discussion in 'Other Single-Cuts' started by reborn old, Nov 14, 2011.

  1. reborn old

    reborn old Senior Member

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    Tokai Japan produced "no serial #" Greco EG models
    during the same late 1980's - early 90's time period as Cort Korea, and beyond.
    This was omitted in the initial Greco portion of the FAQ, and has been confusing to some.


    1- The most telling differences between the two are cavity routes.
    Korean made Cort Grecos always have 45* angled pickup cavity corners, (blue arrows)
    while Japan made Tokai Grecos have standard MIJ squared corner pickup cavity routes, (pic #4 below)

    Pics posted below of both Greco-Tokai Japan produced and Greco-Cort Korea produced examples.

    2- Tokai has consistently used squarish end tab pickup routes while Corts have the more common
    oval end tab routes found on other Grecos.
    Tokai made Grecos I've seen, have medium to medium-long tenons and a 1/2" wide tenon route.
    Later Tokai made Greco models may, or may not have a longer tenon and tenon route, I'm not sure.
    Cort tenons are always 1" or longer, with the tenon route extending to the bottom edge of end tab routes (black arrows).

    3- Tokai switch and pickup wiring runs through a rectangular channel routed into the back
    (angled from the switch to the control cavity)
    while Cort switch and pickup wires run through a round hole drilled between both pickup cavities.
    Wire paths used are consistent, and different, for both makers (white arrows).

    4- Cort pickup cavities are color coated, while Tokai pickup cavities are clear coated and stamped.
     

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  2. reborn old

    reborn old Senior Member

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    5- In control cavities, Tokai has always used 4 routed flat cutout lobes in the 1988+ date range, while Corts have only 2 routed flat cutout lobes (yellow arrows)
    Tokai control cavity wires always enter next to the top (Rhythm) volume control,
    while Cort control cavity wires enter at the lobe flat between both volume pots(white arrows).
    Cort pots are stamped "Cor Tek" below the pot resistance value.
    (Tokai control cavity pic is from a newer Tokai LS, and not a Tokai produced Greco, so electronics are different.
     

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  3. reborn old

    reborn old Senior Member

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    In the absence of cavity pic evidence, you have to rely on less reliable Korea production spotting tips:

    1- Thicker bridge posts threaded into visible metal inserts on Korean models. (Pic # 3 http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/other-les-pauls/167868-_mij__faq_-_links-3.html#post3956921)
    2- Thin bell shaped truss rod covers vs multi layer Japan covers (usually "squared bell" Mint Collection TRC shape)
    3- White control cavity covers for Korean Corts vs always black for Tokai made examples.
    4- Sloped nut on Tokai vs Square nut cross section on Cort made Grecos. (pics 1 vs 2 below)
     

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  4. muccax

    muccax Senior Member

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    hi
    if you look at the back of the head ,,,, you can see that the top of the head is glued to the neck ... the best way to spot a mik :thumb::thumb:
    hope you understand what i am talking about
    and i got tokai made greco eg.. egc ,,, lp jr and sg
    i could send you pictures if you need them
    all the best
    otto
     
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  5. reborn old

    reborn old Senior Member

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    A scarf joint right at the headstock, less obvious than 3/4 of the way up the neck,
    at the weakest part of the guitar. :confused:


    Thanks ! ... or post them here if you wish. :)
    A "Tokai made Greco" EG control cavity pic would be especially helpful...
    since I had to use a Tokai LS control cavity pic up above.
     
  6. jacco

    jacco Senior Member

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    For the ones interested, about pot codes (of course):

    Pot codes on Burny's used from 1981 to 1991, so by Kasuga, Matsumoku and Dyna have the following format:

    First line:
    M500kOhmA (tone) or M500kOhmB (volume)

    Second line:
    YM L

    Year = year
    M = month
    L = type

    M = 0-9, N and D; 0=january, 1= february, etc, N=november and D= december
    L = K or P. K=normal type, P=push-pull

    So now we know what that the second digit bottom row = month, which was pretty obvious to begin with but overlooked.
     
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  7. Udonitron

    Udonitron Psychedelic Stoner Rock Premium Member

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    [​IMG]

    Definitely made for a shop via Fujigen etc.
    This one is cooler as it has a dildo truss cover.
     
  8. bluesyrat

    bluesyrat Senior Member

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    Wonder dildo... when on, it makes strings vibrate and you have your personal ebow...
     
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  9. JDB

    JDB Senior Member

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    Interesting.. where did that pic come from Udo, any more of the whole thing. Looks new.

    Mine is definitely not new. probably 80s by the look of it.
     
  10. slapshot

    slapshot Senior Member

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    nut looks pretty brick like
     
  11. slapshot

    slapshot Senior Member

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    *obviously I didn't write this*

    This is one of the most frustrating questions from the MIJ collector. As I've read many different guitar collector/enthusiast forums and spoken to local guitar dealers, it's clear that the layperson has little to no idea who made their badged guitar from the 1960-1980 period, also known as the MIJ golden age of guitar manufacturing. People often make the mistake of citing the American or European importer as the 'maker' of the guitar, when in fact several Japanese manufacturers were producing badged guitars out of their plants and shipping them to America and Europe to sell. Japanese manufacturers made multiple badges at the same plant, many of whom resemble each other closely. Some manufacturers merged or changed hands over the years which added to the confusion, sometime merging with another maker, only to pick up their name later. In some cases a manufacturer would farm out production to various manufacturers, making it still more difficult to know who made the guitar in your hands. Parts from other guitars would be used in the making of a particular badge for a period of time because it was all the manufacturer had to hand...which doesn't always help in identifying a maker. And sometimes, the guitar which is supposed to be an MIJ guitar is actually made elsewhere (Korea, Indonesia) because production was moved during this period in history. Sounds hopeless, right? Not always!

    This page is a work in progress and as new information is revealed it will be added to the list. But I can't do this alone, folks. See a guitar not listed? Tell me! Listed below are the major manufacturers, known badges and suspected badges to the best of my knowledge in written and list form to make it easy to find out WHO MADE YOUR GUITAR! In some cases I won't know because the badge you have may be extremely rare and virtually unknown to even seasoned collectors.

    And just a quick note: I do not buy or sell guitars. I have no idea what any given guitar from this period would sell for. I don't know if some of the listed guitars are indeed valuable. My sole purpose is to help people looking specifically for information on the maker of their MIJ guitar. So please...don't ask me what your guitar is worth. To me, they're all priceless.

    Atlansia
    This guitar manufacturer started out as a parts supplier in the early 1970's. Atlansia didn't begin production of guitars under their badge until infamous engineer and designer Nobuaki Hayashi of Matsumoku fame became the company's president and chief designer in the late 1970's. Since then, Atlansia has continued to produce cutting-edge guitar designs in Nagano, Japan. The company did not make any other badged guitars other than namesake Atlansia.

    Chushin Gakki
    Chushin is still in operation today in Nagano, Japan and does business with guitar giant Fender. I believe that Chushin may have been a member of the Matsumoto Musical Instruments Association listed further down because both companies produced Fresher guitars during different periods....with Matsumoto beginning production and Chushin ending it (perhaps because the Association was disbanded?). During the 1960-1980 period they were responsible for badges Bambu, Cobran, El Maya and Hisonus as well as some Charvel, Fresher and Jackson badges. The company may have possibly made some guitars with the Aztec, Maya and Robin badges, but that is not verified. Guitars made by Chushin from this period are well-made and appreciated by guitar enthusiasts worldwide.

    Daimaru
    Founded in the city of Matsumoto, Japan in the early 1960's, Daimaru produced their own house brand, although they outsourced electric guitar production to Teisco during the 1970's period. Daimaru appears to have gone out of business after 1980.

    Dyna Gakki
    Dyna Gakki began production in 1972 in the city of Nagano, Japan. They manufactured guitars for Fender Japan and Greco, so they couldn't have been a terrible manufacturer as Fender is very choosy about outsourcing their product. Dyna was responsible for the JooDee badge and may have been a source for Japanese manufacturer Yamaki. Dyna also produced the infamous Ibanez badges for a short period of time.

    Electric Sound Products (ESP)
    Founded in 1975 by Hisatake Shibuya, this wildly-popular manufacturer focused on making quality basses for export as well as electric guitars. ESP survived the 'copy' era and is still in business today. Badges made by ESP included their house brand ESP as well as Navigator during the late 1970's. A possible badge made by the company was Robin.

    Elk Gakki (also known as Miyuki)
    Makers of the Elk badged guitar from the early to mid 1960's to 1975, although other sources indicate that the Elk brand did not stop production until the early 1980's. Elk badged guitars came in clear acrylics in addition to colors in the early 1970's, which was an attempt to copy clear acrylics designed by the legendary Dan Armstrong in the late 1960's.

    Fernandes
    Fernandes Guitars started production in 1969 in Osaka, Japan. It grew and became one of the largest producers of Japanese-made guitars, rivaling competitors Fujigen and Matsumoku. Fernandes produced guitars with the Burny and Nady badges as well as house brand Fernandes. A possible badge made by Fernandes was the oddly named Orange guitar.

    Fujigen Gakki
    Fujigen Gakki began operation in 1960 as a classical guitar manufacturer, moving into the lucurative electric guitar markets in 1962. The company was the largest producer of Japanese guitars during the 1960-1980 period. They were known for producing high quality products, especially for the badged guitar market, which is why the company was selected by so many major American brands. It wasn't until 1970 that the company began making products for the venerable Ibanez brand, which was an unqualified success. Fujigen Gakki was the main manufacturer of choice for Greco badged guitars in the 1970 to 1980 period. They also produced guitars for major manufacturer Yamaha. Badged guitars made by Fujigen include Antoria, Epiphone, Jason and Mann. Badged guitars that may have been made by Fujigen Gakki were Marlin and St. Moritz.

    Guyatone
    Guyatone produced electric guitars for major guitar manufacturer Suzuki. The company also produced their house brand Guyatone. Badged guitars produced by Guyatone include Barclay, Broadway, Coronado, Crestwood, Futurama, Howard, Hi-Lo, Ibanez, Ideal, Imperial, Johnny Guitar, Kent, Kingston, Lafayette, Marco Polo (electrics only), Montclair, Omega, Orpheus, Prestige, Royalist, Saturn, Silhouette, Silvertone, Vernon, Winston and Zenta, an impressive amount of names produced by a single company. Other badges that may have been produced by Guyatone are Beeton (not to be confused by the Beeton Brass Guitar company founded in 1994), Bradford, Canora and Regent.

    Hayashi/Zenon
    Hayashi was one of the premier acoustic guitar makers among Japanese manufacturers from this time frame. Hayashi bought out small manufacturer Zen-On in 1968 during a period of expansion for the company. Credited with making Pearl badged acoustic guitars, Hayashi was also responsible for making Cortez, Custom and Emperador acoustics.

    Hitachi Gakki/Hitachi Musical Instruments Manufacturing
    I'm unsure if this company existed or not, but since many major electronics manufacturers jumped into the electric guitar market in the 1970's, it seems reasonable that Hitachi could have ventured briefly into guitar production. A seller of the badged guitar "Splender" claims it was made by this company. Yet another seller claims the badge Slendon was made by this company.

    Hoshino Gakki Ten/ Tama
    Hoshino Gakki were known primarily for producing Ibanez guitars during this time although that wasn't the only badged guitar they made. Badged guitars produced by Hoshino include Cimar, Cimar by Ibanez, Penco, Howard

    Tama Industries began guitar production from 1962 to 1967 as a factory of Hoshino, producing more badged Ibanez guitars as well as Continental, Crest, Goldentone, Jamboree, King's Stone, Maxitone, Star, Starfield (some), Tulio and Jason. Tama eventually took over badged guitar production from STAR Instruments in the mid-1960's.

    There's some evidence that Tama began producing guitars under their own badge from 1975-1979. I'm unsure at this point if this Tama had any relation to the Tama that existed under Hoshino Gakki Ten.

    Humming Bird
    Little-known manufacturer in operation in the early 1960's until 1968. Humming Bird made electrics that were copies of Mosrite guitars. It's possible they also made acoustics.

    Iida
    Iidi began manufacturing guitars in 1958 in Nagoya, Japan. Iida is still producing guitars, but mostly in their factory located in Korea. They were mainly responsible for producing acoustic and semi-acoustic rather than electric guitars for major manufacturers Ibanez and Yamaha. There is speculation that Iida may have assisted Moridara for a short period in making Morris badged guitars, but that is not verified.

    Kasuga
    Kasuga produced their own house brand in Kasuga guitars. For a brief period of time the company produced Yamaha acoustic guitars. Kasuga guitars were first sold in America in 1972. Unlike many Japanese manufacturers who outsourced their guitar production in other factories outside the main maker, Kasuga produced all their products in-house. Badged guitars known to have been made by Kasuga include Conrad, Emperador, ES-S, Ganson, Heerby, Hondo, Mei Mei and Roland. Kasuga went out of business in 1996.

    Kawai Teisco
    Kawai Teisco was founded by Atswo Kaneko and Doryu Matsuda. The company also produced the popular Ibanez badge in the 1960's. Kawai Teisco made their own house brands Kawai, Teisco, Del Rey and Teisco Del Rey. Badged guitars produced by the Kawai Teisco factories include Apollo, Aquarius, Arbiter, Atlas, Audition, Avar, Ayar, Barth, Beltone, Black Jack, Cipher, Concert, Cougar, Crown, Daimaru, Decca, Diasonic, Domino, Duke, Emperador, Heit Deluxe, Hy-Lo, Holiday, Imperial, Inter-Mark Cipher, Jedson, Kay, Kent, Kimberly, Kingsley, Kingston, Keefy, Lindell, Marquis, May Queen, Minister, Noble, Prestige, Randall, Recco, Regina, Rexina, Sakai, Satellite, Schaffer, Sekova, Silvertone, Sorrento, Sterling, Swinger, Tele Star, Top Twenty, Victoria, and Winston. Possible badged guitars made by the company include: Astrotone, Demian, G-Holiday, Lafayette, Master, Orange, Tamaki and Trump.

    Kyowa Shokai
    This company, which may have been a distributor as opposed to a manufacturer, was a member of the Matsumoto Musical Instrument Association. They have been credited with Camel and Fresher badged guitars, although Freshers were also made by Chushin in the late 1970's.

    Magnavox/Ampeg
    Ampeg was swallowed up by Japanese electrical giant Magnavox in 1971, when they wanted to get in on the electric guitar copy craze of the 1970's. Magnavox produced electric and bass guitars under the Stud badge as well as the successful Ampeg brand. It's been suggested that Magnavox was also responsible for producing Selmer acoustic guitar badges during this time, but that has not been verified. Selmer was sold to Magnavox around the same time they bought Ampeg, so it certainly seems plausible they could have made Selmer acoustic badged guitars as an offering for that market. Stud badged guitars were made until '75, with Ampeg guitar production continuing until 1980. Opus was another badge made by the company. Magnavox lost their interest in Ampeg shortly thereafter and the brand languished until it was resurrected over a decade later by another American company.

    Maruha Gakki
    We know this company existed in the 1970's in Japan because of stickers found inside repaired Maruha guitars. Maruha made high-quality acoustics, some of which are badged F. Hashimoto (some long lost master luthier?) along with the Maruha badges. These guitars are highly sought-after because of the overall quality.

    Matsumoku
    Matsumoku is one of the Japanese manufacturers that did not survive long after the heyday of the 1970's guitar market despite having a long tradition of quality stringed instrument craftsmanship. Matsumoku produced guitars for major manufacturers Greco, Guyatone and Yamaha. Matsumoku made Arai, Aria, Aria Pro II and Aria Diamond badges, with Aria being their primary badge for a majority of this time frame. Badged guitars known to have been made by Matsumoku include Apollo, Arita, Barclay, Burny, Capri, Columbus, Conrad, Cortez (electrics only), Country, Cutler, Dia, Domino, Electra, Epiphone, Granada, Hi Lo, Howard, Ibanez, Lindberg, Lyle, Luxor, Maxitone (this guitar differs from Tama's Maxitone badge), Mayfair, Memphis, Montclair, Pan, Pearl (electrics only), Raven, Stewart, Tempo, Univox ,Vantage, Ventura, Vision, Volhox, Washburn (in 1979 and 1980), Westbury, Westminster and Westone. Possible Matsumoku badges include: Bruno, Crestwood, Conqueror, Eros, Mako, Memphis, Orlando and Toledo.

    Matsumoto Musical Instrument Manufacturers Association
    The Matsumoto Musicial Instrument Manufacturers Association was the organization responsible for Fresher guitars. Little is known about this association, other than it did not have larger guitar manufacturers Matsumoku or Fujigen Gakki as members. Nakai Gakki was a possible member of the association. Fresher guitars began production in 1973 by the Kyowa Shokai Company, an association member, which was also responsible for the Camel badge. It's interesting to note that Fresher guitars were eventually being produced by Chushin, which leads me to believe that they may have been an Association member along with Kyowa. The beginning production year was considered a low quality benchmark for the company. The Fresher brand continuously improved in quality until 1980.

    Maya Guitar Company
    Located in Kobe, Japan, this manufacturer made the famous Maya brand guitar. Maya guitars were in production from 1970-1980. It's been suggested that Maya may have been responsible for the Aztec badge. You'll notice that Maya has been attributed to a company known as Tahara. At this point I do not know if Maya assisted in production or if Tahara produced some Maya guitars as a subcontractor. Maya and El Maya badges have also been attributed to Chushin Gakki. More research is needed to clarify this point.

    Moridaira (Morris Guitars)
    Founded in 1967 by Toshio "Mori" Moridaira, the Moridaira factory produced high-quality guitars, including the infamous Morris badged guitar. Moridaira also produced badged guitars for Hohner including Coronado, Futurama, H.S. Anderson, Lotus (some) and Sakai.

    Nakai Gakki
    Little-known manufacturer from Osaka, Japan, this company is responsible for the oddly named John Bennet badge. Nakai has been mentioned as a possible Matusmoto Musical Instruments Association member in the past. The company still exists and is producing musical instruments, quite a feat in light of so many manufacturers who faded after the golden electric guitar age.

    Shinko Musical Company
    A very small, unknown company that is attributed to being the manufacturer of the Pleasant guitar from 1960 to 1966. Shinko later moved to Korea sometime in the early 1970's where they produced the Drive guitar badge.

    Shiro Musical Instrument Manufacturing Company, Limited
    This little-known company is responsible for the St. George badge. This particular badge was made from 1963-1967. It also produced the rare Shiro guitar. It is possible that the company may also be responsible for the Pleasant guitar badge after 1966. This company may have been a small offshoot of Aria Guitar Company, founded by Shiro Arai, but that has not been verified as of today.

    STAR Instruments
    This company slowly merged into Hoshino/Tama but prior to their unification, produced instruments with the Star badge, mainly drums. They also produced guitars, including the infamous Zim-Gar badged electric and acoustic guitars. Over time, drum production was segmented to Pearl, while guitar contracts were taken up by Tama. Zim-Gar production was relatively short, as these were budget guitars made for K-mart between 1962 and 1968.

    Suzuki Musical Instrument Manufacturing
    Suzuki had two factories in Kiso and Hamamatsu where they made popular Suzuki guitars. The Hummingbird Suzuki guitar was manufactured in the Kiso factory. Suzuki is also credited with making the Canora and Takeharu badged guitars along with Marco Polo acoustics. Holly is another badge ascribed to Suzuki, although that has not been verified.

    Tahara
    Founded by a father and son, Ryohei Tahara and the unknown Tahara. I do not know which was the father and which was the son. The company existed until the late 1979 when it was bought up by Saga Musical Instruments. In all, the company existed less than a decade as Tahara. Both the Maya and El Maya badges are attributed to Tahara. Saga Musical Instruments exists to this day.

    Takamine
    Founded in 1962 in Sakashita, Japan, this manufacturer survived the copy era and is still producing guitars to this day. Takamine was among the first to make and export electric acoustics with their own house brand, although they are primarily known for their acoustic guitars. It is unknown if they made badged guitars.

    Terada
    Terada was one of the smaller Japanese manufacturers of acoustic guitars during the period of 1960 to 1980, producing products for Epiphone, Fender Japan, Grapham, Gretch and Vesta. Terada produced some Kingston badges until 1975. Other badged guitars produced by Terada include some Burny badges and interesting Thumb guitars. Terada has been in continuous operation since 1912.

    Tokai
    Tokai was founded in 1947 and is based in Hamamatsu, Japan. Tokai began production of acoustic guitars in 1965 and by 1968 was producing electric guitars for the American market. Tokai still exists as guitar manufacturer. Tokai made guitars for Fernandes, Mosrite and Fender Japan. Tokai badged guitars included the house brand Tokai as well as Cat's Eyes, Conrad, Drifter, Hondo, Love Rock, Mosrite, Sigma and Silver Star. Possible badges include Artist Ltd., Gaban, Gallan, Gession and Robin. It's suggested that Tokai made Hummingbird acoustics as well, but if these were related to those made by Humming Bird I haven't quite sorted out yet.

    Tombo
    Tombo was the only Japanese manufacturer who produced Norma badged guitars. Tombo made Norma guitars from 1965 to 1970. Badged guitars produced by Tombo include Angelica, Asama, Columbus, Condor, Duke, Horugel, Kinor, Montaya, Queen, Regina, Schaffer and Yamato.

    Toyota
    Is there anything T. Kurosawa didn't attempt to manufacture in the 1970's? Yes, Toyota manufactured a high-end line of acoustic, electric and bass guitars from approximately 1972. Toyota ceased manufacturing guitars in a short span of time (probably because they didn't sell), although exactly when in the 1970's production ended, I'm not sure.

    Yamaha/Nippon Gakki
    Founded in 1946, Yamaha is still going strong in the electric guitar market as a manufacturer. During the timeframe this article covers (1960-1980) all Yamaha guitars were made in Japan, although not necessarily in their factories as they outsourced to other manufacturers.

    Yamaki
    Yamaki was founded in the 1960 by brothers Yasuyuki and Hirotsygu. Yamaki exists today as a major manufacturer of guitar parts for outside Japanese guitar manufacturers. Yamaki produced a house brand, as well as Daion, Dion, Grande and Jedson badged guitars.

    Zen-On (see also Hayashi)
    Little known Japanese manufacturer who was out of business by 1968. Zen-On made electric guitars with the house brand Zen-on badge, as well as Beltone, Morales and Zenon badges. Zen-On bought out Hayashi, but exactly when that took place is clouded in mystery.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  12. BGD

    BGD Senior Member

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    This is where I get confused: that large list/article seems to make "factories" and companies one and the same. In other words: Fernandes made Burny. But then there's Fujigen and Terada and Dyna in that list right alongside Fernandes. My understanding is that Fernandez is the company, Fujigen (or Terada, etc) is the "factory" (the group of people who were contracted at the time to make the guitars), and Burny is the brand. To put it more bluntly: There are no "Fernandes-made" guitars, right? There are Fernandez guitars (their designs, brands) that are made at one of a handful of possible shops.

    Now I'm well aware there's some mushiness there, as there are actual FGN (Fujigen) guitars, which means they're not just a shop. Unless, of course, FGN is a brand named after where it's made.

    I kind of look at it like food items at a grocery store. We do a lot of our shopping at Target. So take a hypothetical trip to Target with me, won't you?

    You have name-brand foods, and then you have generics. I'll use Fig Newtons as an example (I don't know if this is the case, but bear with me). You go down the aisle, and you see Fig Newtons. You decide, you want some cookies.

    So... you pick up Fig Newtons. These cookies are a KRAFT food. The brand is KEEBLER. The model is Fig Newton.

    Next to it: so-called "generic" Fig Chews. These are a TARGET food. The brand is MARKET PANTRY. The model is Fig Chews. (Note: I don't know if these even exist.)

    Next to that: Healthy Ones Fig Delights. Wow, half the fat! These are a COOKIE CORP food. The brand is HEALTHY ONES. The model is Fig Delights. (I made this whole company/brand/product up.)

    OK, so we have company, brand, model. But these don't necessarily indicate where they are made. Kraft may have its own proprietary operations that make Mac & Cheese from the tailings of Fig Newtons. Meanwhile, Target may not be in the business at all of actually manufacturing Fig Chews, so they outsource it to SO SWEET BAKERS (a fictional commercial bakery I just came up with). SO SWEET BAKERS, unbeknownst to most people, are also be the people who make the Healthy Ones Fig Delights.

    In this case, it would not be accurate to make an apples to apples comparison of Kraft, Target, Cookie Corp, and So Sweet Bakers. Kraft makes its own product in-house (Gibson), Market Pantry (Fernandes) and Cookie Corp (Greco) design and price their own models in-house but then outsource the actual manufacture to a bakery. So Sweet (Fujigen) doesn't design or market or brand or price any of its own cookies. So they are the odd one out in this. As a consumer, you have your choice of three distinct soft fig cookies. They each have different prices, calorie counts, etc. But two of them are made under the same roof.

    The "mushiness" I mentioned with FGN Guitars would be where you go to Target to get your cookies and you see yet another brand on the shelf: So Sweet Fig Bars.

    Is this an accurate analogy? And if so, then in the case of the So Sweet Fig Bars, is So Sweet Bakeries saying "The hell with these fools at Kraft and Target, we have all the best ingredients, we're the ones who know how to bake, so why don't we make OUR OWN cookies and go to market?" OR... is it Cookie Corp going, "We've got a great idea for a more high-end artisanal cookie. And to give it more authenticity, we'll actually name it after the bakery who we're going to contract to make it!"?

    I spent a lot of time on this damn post so you better pile on the likes and thanks. And...BEGIN!
     
  13. reborn old

    reborn old Senior Member

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    While it might be daunting to some newcomers, there is never any ambiguity as to which companies were producers (parent company who's name goes on the headstock) and which were manufacturers (factories that actually made the guitars) in the post you quoted.

    For example:
    Tokai produced and manufactured all their own guitars (except for Korean base models after 1985, and modern Chinese base models)
    as well as guitars for other producers.

    Fernandes on the other hand, produced all of their guitar orders by contracting them out to 3rd party manufacturers :
    Terada + Tokai for FLG models, Terada, Kasuga, Matsumoku, Dyna, Fujigen, Tokai and Yako (Taiwan) for their RLG models.
    Fernandes used their parent company logo on export FLG + RLG models and domestic Fender copies.
    Burny, a Fernandes subsidiary company name, was used for Japan domestic FLG + RLG model headstocks.
     
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  14. Matty

    Matty Senior Member

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    What's a Fig Newton?
     
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  15. BGD

    BGD Senior Member

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    A soft cookie with fig jam (or something) in the middle. I'm not even sure why I picked it. Haven't had since I was a kid.
     
  16. LBG

    LBG Senior Member

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    I'd give anything to see a Toyota branded Les Paul. I bet the neck's not very fast but it will get 40 SPN (seconds per note) [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sC75aU47GRk]Sad Trombone Sound Effect - YouTube[/ame]
     
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  17. slapshot

    slapshot Senior Member

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    i'd be more interested in it they'd be as indestructable as the Toyota Hilux
     
  18. Udonitron

    Udonitron Psychedelic Stoner Rock Premium Member

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    Fig Newtons ROCK!
    They have strawberry, blueberry, etc as well.
    De Rish!:thumb:

    Regarding pickguards, I have several Burny PG's that have the hole placement in different locations but they all seem to share that bevelled rounded point to that at the neck pup screw area.
     
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  19. Kangaroo Court

    Kangaroo Court Senior Member

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    When did Tokai start/cease using the circuit boards, and are they prevalent throughout their whole range of vintage models?
     
  20. jacco

    jacco Senior Member

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    The circuit board was used right from the start in 1978 on all models, from 1979 on all except LS200 and from 1980 on all models except LS150&200.
    Don't know when it ended, I did own a 1997 model with circuit board.
     
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